• Ontario
  • Elementary

Holy Name of Jesus

HNPN

“A small town in the center of Ontario!”

  • 7 Challenges Completed
  • 10 Challenges not completed

Buckle Up

Completed

Description

We started by brainstorming ways students get around Hornepayne. We then took that list and sorted them in to those that use energy and those that don't. Students recognized that those that use energy pollute and the other ways don't pollute and in fact, contribute to a healthy, active lifestyle. Students made posters to encourage others to be active and healthy in getting around town, and not choose ways that pollute. These posters are displayed on our Energy Diet display board.

Images & Downloads

Do You Really Need It?

Completed

Description

As a class, we discussed needs vs. wants and what the criteria was for things to be in each category. Examples were discussed. Since this was our first activity for the Energy Diet, I explained what we were going to be doing as a class through the Energy Diet and how our needs can be filled while using less energy, whereas our wants often require us to use lots more energy. Students fill out the worksheet. I noticed most students replaced on energy consuming activity with a different one, instead of giving up energy altogether.

Images & Downloads

How Big Are Your Carbon Feet?

Completed

Description

As a class, we watched a few YouTube videos on carbon footprints so students could learn the concept of a carbon footprint. Then students calculated their own carbon footprint using an online calculator. From this, students learned what strategies reduced their carbon footprints and how to implement them. These ideas were then displayed on the footprints which we added to our Energy Diet display board.

Images & Downloads

Limited Edition: Game Time!

Completed

Description

Students watched a video about food waste. They learned about all the resources and money that gets wasted along with the food and different ways it can be resolved. We talked about the ideas presented. Students used those ideas to complete the worksheet. I asked them to list vocabulary associated with this concept and then students played a game of charades to have other classmates guess the word they were acting out. I thought this might be difficult with words such as "compost" and "methane gas", but they did really well! And enjoyed it!

Images & Downloads

Round and Round it Goes

Completed

Description

I showed a video of the circular economy by showing how different items can be removed and recycled from electronics/appliances in order to be reused. I connected this to our electronics bin at the town dump saying how it removes these items from our landfill, but parts are used to make new electronics. I then extrapolated this idea into how we "recycle" in Hornepayne (where there is no recycling program available) by offering items on our local Facebook group for people to buy (outgrown children's clothing/toys, scrap snowmobile/bicycle parts, etc.). Students then saw how they do the same at home (like turning old clothes into something useful). I had them use their ideas of our circular economy in Hornepayne to complete the infographic.

Images & Downloads

The Phantom of the Classroom

Completed

Description

We watched a few YouTube videos so students could understand what Phantom Power is and how wasteful it is, both in terms of energy and money. I then used the classroom to show students examples of Phantom Power and what it looked like (usually a light on while the device is not in use - standby mode). I then compared it to something similar - the EXIT sign whose light is on, but that's its purpose. Students went throughout the school looking for examples of Phantom Power and marking it on their school maps. We discussed ways to reduce Phantom Power; by using a power bar that you can turn off when the items are not in use so they are not sucking power.

Images & Downloads

What’s For Lunch?

Completed

Description

We did this activity on Shrove Tuesday, where normally the whole school would eat pancakes and sausages cooked by my class. We couldn't this year, because of COVID, but as a class, we worked together to determine food miles of a Shrove Tuesday feast. We determined the ingredients needed for a Shrove Tuesday meal and where they come from. Blueberries, which can be found in the bush surrounding us, and eggs were given 0km (a student has a farm where her family raises chickens which they sell locally). Students googled the distance from each other source city to Hornepayne, marked it on the map, and the food miles for Shrove Tuesday were calculated. As a class, we discussed how it could decreased by replacing orange juice with apple juice grown in Niagara. Students recognized that because we're so isolated, our food miles are quite high. It could be reduced by living off the land as the Cree and Ojibwe did, but this would mean limited variety in our diet (to which we have become accustomed).

Images & Downloads

A Green-Powered Canada

Incomplete

Community Connections

Incomplete

Get Growing

Incomplete

One Hour No Power

Incomplete

Story Time

Incomplete

Take-Home

Incomplete

Tips and Tricks

Incomplete

Video Challenge

Incomplete

Water Works

Incomplete

What’s Old is New Again

Incomplete

Energy savings by the numbers

water_works 28,843 Litres of water conserved
hour_no_power 856 Hours of no power
take_home 6,270 Items Kept from Landfill